Amgueddfa Blog

A selection of emotive, thought-provoking images from the period of the First World War has been added to the National Museum Wales Commercial Picture Library and Museum Wales Prints service.

In 2014, National Museum Cardiff held an exhibition, The Great War: Britain’s Efforts and Ideals, which displayed a complete series of 66 lithographs of artistic propaganda prints commissioned by the Bureau of Propaganda (later renamed the Ministry of Information) in 1917. 

The aim of the series was to encourage a war-weary public and to raise support for the war effort. The lithographs were published under the two titles ‘Efforts’ and ‘Ideals’ and contain work contributed by 18 artists including Frank Brangwyn, Muirhead Bone, George Clausen and A. S. Hartrick.

Under the ‘Efforts’ section, nine of the artists were commissioned to produce six works under a heading, including Making Guns, Women’s Work and Wounded. Within the ‘Ideals’ portfolio, the 12 artists illustrated the ambitions and aims of the war. The artists were given subjects to work within and each of the images had to pass censorship regulations.  

Each image shows people going about their daily lives during the war. Like so many others, they were ordinary people living in extraordinary times, selflessly sacrificing for others and all of us today.

To read more about this collection, please open the following link by Rhodri Viney, Digital Content Assistant at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales:

Blog by Rhodri Viney

To reflect upon the centenary of the end of the First World War, National Museum Cardiff is holding an exhibition entitled Poppies for Remembrance. This exhibition will explore how the poppy became the symbol for remembrance, provide an opportunity for contemplation and reflection on loss and recovery, as well as look at the science of poppy biodiversity, the many species of poppies worldwide and the threats to their existence.  The exhibition will run from 21 July 2018 to 3 March 2019. Details below:

Poppies for Remembrance Exhibition

 

Commercial Picture Library

Museum Wales Prints

Bydd Amgueddfa Cymru yn dyfarnu tystysgrifau Gwyddonwyr Gwych i ysgolion o ar draws y DU, i gydnabod eu cyfraniad i'r Ymchwiliad Bylbiau’r Gwanwyn i Ysgolion.

Llongyfarchiadau anferth i bob un o’r ysgolion!

Diolch i bob un o’r 4,830 disgybl a helpodd eleni! Diolch am weithio mor galed yn plannu, arsylwi a chofnodi, rydych yn wir yn Wyddonwyr Gwych! Bydd pob un ohonoch yn derbyn tystysgrif a phensel Gwyddonydd Gwych.

Diolch yn fawr i Ymddiriedolaeth Edina am eu nawdd ac am helpu i wireddu’r prosiect.

Ysgolion fydd yn derbyn tystysgrifau:

Bydd pob un yn derbyn tystysgrifau a phensiliau Gwyddonwyr Gwych.

Cydnabyddiaeth arbennig:

I dderbyn tystysgrifau, pensiliau a hadau.

Clod uchel:

I dderbyn tystysgrifau, pensiliau ac amrywiaeth o hadau.

Yn ail:

I dderbyn tystysgrifau, pensiliau, amrywiaeth hadau a taleb rhodd.

Enillwyr 2018:

I dderbyn tystysgrifau, pensiliau, hadau a gwobr i'r dosbarth!

 

Hi everyone! Uri here, your cultured dog with a blog. You may have read all about my adventures at National Museum Cardiff. Recently I've accompanied my PA (or Mum, as she likes to be called) to another great museum in the Amgueddfa Cymru family: St Fagans National Museum of History.

This is a special museum with lots of outside spaces, buildings, and even a farm. There were actual sheep there - in a museum! There are lots of interesting sniffs and smells - great for doggy visitors - but I tried hard to stay in work mode.

Mum was a bit surprised on our recent visit when I guided her through the big automatic doors and into a huge, shiny white hall. This was a new and unfamiliar space. Mum explained that St Fagans has undergone lots of changes recently. She has been visiting since a child and has enjoyed watched the museum grow and develop over the years. 

One of the great things about the development is the new programme of activities that we have been able to take part in. We made a ring out of antlers in the new Gweithdy building (well, Mum made the ring while I snoozed under her chair); went behind-the-scenes to see some historic quilts collected especially for humans to handle; and even worked with an artist to make our own version of the Eisteddfod chair.

It’s a big place but I’m slowly getting my bearings and look forward to more  visits to St Fagans soon! 

Hello everyone, my name’s Eirini and I am a student intern in the Archaeology and Numismatics department at NMW, Cardiff. This post is the second in my series of blogs on the numismatics collection at the Museum. Last time I took a look at the collection of Ancient Greek coins and this week I am back to examine the Roman coin collection.

While the Ancient Greeks never set foot in Wales, the Romans invaded in AD 48 so there have been a great deal of Roman coins found and reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Here are a few of my favourites from the collections.

Hoard of silver denarii found in Wick, Vale of Glamorgan (c. AD 165)

The 2 oldest coins date back to the Republic and are both coins of Mark Anthony while the rest date to the Empire. The front side of all of the Empire coins have portraits of an emperor, ranging from Nero (AD 54-68) to Marcus Aurelius (AD 161-180).

The most interesting aspect of this coin hoard is the variety of reverse designs on them! There are many coins dating to the reigns of Vespasian (AD 69-79) and Trajan (AD 98-117). These coins predominately feature deities and personifications on their reverse sides. Some examples of the deities featured include Jupiter, Hercules and Mars. One design that sticks out to me is the personification of peace (Pax) holding an olive branch, sceptre and cornucopia (a horn that symbolises abundance). Other personifications include Pietas (duty) and Felicitas (good fortune).

There is an extensive variety of other reverse types on the coins including representations of the emperor and his family, types of military conquest and victories, legionary types, geographical imagery, architecture, animals and propaganda.

I like how varied the imagery is on these Roman coins as later coins found in Sully (c. AD 320), Bridgend (c. AD 310) and Llanbethery (c. AD 350) as well as our modern coins tend to have the same, repeated imagery on their reverse.

Sully Hoard of copper-alloy coins (c. AD 320)

This hoard is one of the largest hoards of Roman coins found in Wales. An incredible 5913 coins were discovered in two locations, 3 metres apart in the South Wales coastal village of Sully.

The latest coins from this collection all have the same reverse design regardless of where they were minted, from London to Rome –they represent an early single currency with a standardised design not found in the earlier hoards.

However, the designs on these coins are more crude and less detailed than the earlier Roman finds.

Helo Cyfeillion y Gwanwyn,

Diolch i’r ysgolion sef wedi rhannu ei chofnodion blodau! Cofiwch i wneud yn siŵr bod y dyddiad yn gywir a bod taldra'r planhigyn wedi ei chofnodi yn filimedrau. Rydym wedi cael cofnodion yn dweud bod planhigion wedi blodeuo ym mis Ebrill a hefo disgrifiadau am grocws a chennin pedr anhygoel o fyr!

Os ydych yn gweld bod eich cofnodion angen ei chywiro, yna yrrwch rhai newydd i mewn hefo esboniad o hyn yn y bwlch sylwadau.

Rwyf wedi mwynhau darllen y sylwadau hefo’r cofnodion tywydd a blodau dros y pythefnos diwethaf. Rwyf wedi atodi rhai o’r sylwadau isod. Daeth cwestiwn diddorol o Ysgol Stanford in the Vale flwyddyn ddiwethaf, yn gofyn a oedd rhaid cofnodi pob blodyn i’r wefan os oedd y dyddiad a’r taldra'r un peth? Mae’n bwysig i rannu’r cofnodion i gyd, oherwydd mae'r nifer o blanhigion sydd yn blodeuo ar ddyddiad unigol a’r taldra'r planhigion yn effeithio'r canlyniadau.

I weithio allan taldra cymedrig eich ysgol ar gyfer y crocws a’r cennin pedr, adiwch bob taldra o’r crocws neu’r cennin peder, a rhannwch hefo'r nifer o gofnodion. Felly os oes genych deg cofnodion o daldra i’r crocws, adiwch y rhain at ei gilydd a rhannwch hefo deg i gael y rhif cymedrig.

Os oes gennych un blodyn hefo taldra o 200mm ac un blodyn hefo taldra o 350mm, fydd y rhif cymedrig yn 275mm. Ond, os oes gennych un blodyn hefo taldra o 200mm a deg hefo taldra o 350mm fydd y rhif cymedrig yn 336mm. Dyma pam mae’n bwysig i gofnodi pob cofnod blodau.

Mae pob cofnod blodau yn bwysig ac yn cael effaith ar y canlyniadau. Os nad yw eich planhigyn wedi tyfu erbyn diwedd mis Mawrth, plîs wnewch gofnod data heb ddyddiad na thaldra ac esboniwch pam yn y bwlch sylwadau. Os mae eich planhigyn yn tyfu, ond ddim yn blodeuo erbyn diwedd mis Mawrth, yna plîs cofnodwch daldra'r planhigyn, heb ddyddiad blodeuo, ac esboniwch hyn yn y bwlch sylwadau.

Cadwch y cwestiynau yn dod Cyfeillion y Gwanwyn! Mae 'na nifer o adnoddau ar y wefan i helpu hefo’r prosiect. Unwaith mae eich planhigyn wedi blodeuo, fedrwch greu llun ohono a defnyddio hyn i labelu'r rhannau o’r planhigyn! Hoffwn weld ffotograff o rain, a wnâi rhannu pob un sy’n cael ei yrru ata i ar fy blog nesaf!

Daliwch ati gyda’r gwaith called Cyfeillion y Gwanwyn,

Athro’r Ardd